Teahouse and leisurely life

Authors: Go Chengdu

2014-05-20

An old Chengdu saying goes, “Sunny days are rare, but teahouses are abundant”. Teahouses have played diverse social roles in the history of Chengdu. Locals are passionate about going to tea houses — not only for tea, snacks, and entertainment, but also for social gatherings and business meetings
An old Chengdu saying goes, “Sunny days are rare, but teahouses are abundant”. Teahouses have played diverse social roles in the history of Chengdu. Locals are passionate about going to tea houses — not only for tea, snacks, and entertainment, but also for social gatherings and business meetings.
Chinese tea culture is perhaps best exemplified by the bamboo chairs and wooden tables found in the hundreds of teahouses throughout Chengdu, with jasmine tea being served as the local staple. As early as the Western Han period (206BC - 9AD), both tea trade and tea culture were very prosperous in Sichuan with Chengdu as the starting point of the Southern Silk Road.
Mahjong
Mahjong has been an essential part of most local people’s life. Almost every household in Chengdu has at least one mahjong set. People play mahjong at home or in tea houses, where friends and families chat over mahjong tables, making mahjong an important social vehicle.
Birth place of Nongjia-le
Nongjia-le (lit. Happy Rural Home) refers to the practice of suburban and rural residents converting their houses into restaurants, hotels and entertainment spaces in order to attract city dwellers.
Chengdu claims to have first practiced the modern business model of Nongjia-le. It features different styles and price levels and offers delicious and affordable home-made dishes — as well as mahjong facilities.
Some of the most popular ones are located in Sansheng Village east of Chengdu, and Nongke Village in Pixian County, which was the birthplace of Nongjia-le.
 
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